Friday 5 – Week 84

Here’s what we’re looking at this week…

View on Twitter

Kristen Eshleman, Director of Digital Innovation Davidson College

Emergent EDU: Complexity and Innovation in Higher Ed

Guided by the principles of complexity science and working collectively, innovation leaders can and should develop the frameworks that both speak to academic values and help all of us in higher education adapt to a changing context.

When we talk about innovation in higher education, what we are really talking about is how to manage, or account for, uncertainty. In a thoughtful blog post on innovation and change pressures in higher education, the educator and researcher George Siemens suggests that the Cynefin framework may be the “best guidance . . . on how to function in our current context.”4 Developed by Dave Snowden and Mary Boone, this framework provides a good model for understanding and managing institutions from the perspective of complexity science.

The traditional structures and ways of working in higher education run the risk of falling too far behind the pace of change. If we want our institutions to be the center of accessible education, then the most important next steps for higher education may be to rethink organizational structures and establish innovation teams. Guided by the principles of complexity science and working collectively, CIOs, provosts, directors of academic innovation, and others tapped to lead innovation can and should develop the frameworks that both speak to academic values and help us all adapt to a changing context.

Read more

View on Twitter

View on Twitter

View on Twitter
Top