H

Our Blogs  

Guest Bloggers

Why I like waking up in the morning

By Laurie Webster  ·  October 24, 2012  ·  SenseMaker®, Data visualisation, Reflections

Since joining Cognitive Edge in 2010, I have found great professional satisfaction in helping our clients recognize problems and make decisions about moving forward. At a more personal level, I have enjoyed greatly the behind-the-scenes aspects of the research and analysis -- setting up data collection, analyzing diverse sets of results, and finding novel ways to present outcomes, both numerically and visually. This has included becoming expert in the use of the SenseMaker® software and also finding complementary tools that expand...

Continued…

And…I’m back!

By Jules K. Yim  ·  September 25, 2012  ·  Memories, Musings, Reflections

Excitement mounts. In a couple days I'll be flying to Jakarta as one-sixteenth of Cappella Martialis to sing Brahms' Ein Deutsches Requiem together with the Reformed Oratorio Societies Jakarta and Singapore at the Aula Simfonia – incidentally, Jakarta's first and so far only symphony concert hall. The plan is to perform and then engage in post-concert rituals, which should hopefully rejuvenate one and all.

As you might've guessed the reason for my hiatus from blogging was a combination of part-time undergraduate studies, full-time...

Continued…

Narrative Research’s Top 10 List

By Laurie Webster  ·  July 24, 2012  · 

It's about time we have a top ten list about narrative research. This is in the spirit of David Letterman, a late night talk show host here in the U.S.


10. Narrative research doesn't eliminate leadership errors - you can have great insights, but you still need to act on them - remember safe-to-fail!

9. Narrative research means you can and should still leverage social data. What else is being said out there that could give you more insights?

8. Narrative research requires new tools and technology (SenseMaker) - and don't...

Continued…

Cynefin - a time management and productivity tool?

By Iwan Jenkins  ·  February 14, 2012  · 

The thirst for easy fixes to the challenges of time management appears unslakable. I have no doubt that for some, the act of seeking and tinkering with the latest ‘getting-things-done’ (GTD) tool/philosophy/process is an addiction.

It affirms we all seek efficiency without compromising effectiveness. And in a minor example of exaptation, the Cynefin framework has the potential to be a useful tool in this pursuit.

As written previously, a CEO and I were talking about the use of Cynefin to aid in the setting and monitoring of...

Continued…

Curing growing pains with Cynefin

By Iwan Jenkins  ·  February 9, 2012  · 

How does a successful entrepreneurial organisation deal with operational growth pains without losing its ‘soul?’

I have been working with an Asia-based family owned business that markets health products through retail outlets. The business has grown considerably since starting 15 years ago (revenue of $2bn), and has ambitions to grow further. However, certain aspects of the operation are failing to keep pace with the market opportunities and the ‘rapid and flexible’ decision making processes of senior management.

Application of...

Continued…

Extracting value from Fear and Loathing

By Iwan Jenkins  ·  February 7, 2012  · 

About 12 months ago, I attended an early morning meeting whose sole purpose was to approve a short list of strategic options. Based on bravado over the bacon and eggs and the strong opinions regarding the ‘follies’ of certain investments, I was looking forward to a hearty debate prior to exultant agreement. However, within minutes it became clear that the dawn bluster was all wind. I think the phrase from the home state is, “big hat, no cattle.”

Giving this CEO his due, he did ask for dissenting and contrarian perspective before...

Continued…

Management vs Tonga

By Iwan Jenkins  ·  January 25, 2012  · 

I had a fantastic day Sunday last; good lunch, stimulating diverse conversation, rugby in Wales, and all in the company of Dave Snowden.

The conversation covered philosophy, literature, the strength and frailties of human nature, the needs of (all of us in) management to have a degree of certainty in decision outcomes.

Now, in certain contexts, exclusively quantitative measurements are powerful decision aids, but we fall into trouble when we extend the context inappropriately, yet still maintain our absolute belief in the power...

Continued…

The Volcano Principle

By Joseph Pelrine  ·  June 21, 2011  · 

 

On 14 April 2010 a small volcano erupted in Iceland, and before people could even pronounce the name Eyjafjallajökull, all air traffic in Europe was paralyzed. I was lucky. The eruption caught me while I was at home, and although my wife was happy about me being home for a week, my client was not happy about my absence. It hit friends of mine worse, some of whom were on stuck on trains from Lviv to Amsterdam for over 48 hours, or my friend, a flight attendant for Swiss Airlines, whose flight was stranded somewhere and whose...

Continued…

Leadership Networks

By Keith Ray  ·  June 2, 2011  · 

The other day while working with a group of managers on succession planning and development, background stories emerged that hinted at the question: Are leaders born or made? Nature vs. nurture is a persistent debate regarding the source of leadership. Managers, academics, and consultants all have views about which contributes more to making good leaders -- genes or experience. One study (Arvey et al, 2007) looked at twins and found that the split was 30% genetics and 70% experience. You don’t need to look too long before you find a...

Continued…

Brine flies and petroglyphs

By Keith Ray  ·  May 31, 2011  · 

tufa%20red%20clouds%20small.jpg


This weekend was a holiday here in the U.S. I took a day trip 200 miles north to Mono Lake to photograph the strange and beautiful rock formations at the lake. The formations are called tufa and consist of calcium carbonate fused together in a geologic process thousands of years old. It is one of the oldest lakes in North America and dates back at least 760,000 years and perhaps over 1 million years old. These formations are up to a few meters high and are formed when calcium rich fresh water percolates up through the heavier...

Continued…

 

Categories

Chronology